Contributor to 2 features on Bloomberg Law

//Contributor to 2 features on Bloomberg Law

Contributor to 2 features on Bloomberg Law

Broken Ventilators Require Easier Fixes::

Virus Masks’ Poor Fit Unlikely to Get Fixed in Court for Workers

Originally published on www.news.BloombergLaw.com

 

“California Gov. Gavin Newsom tweeted that Los Angeles received 170 broken ventilators from the stockpile in March. Northwell Health, the largest health system in New York state, told Bloomberg Law that most of the few hundred ventilators it received were missing air hoses and stands. A spokesman for the New York State Department of Public Health said only one of the 2,140 ventilators the state received from the strategic national stockpile had to be sent out for maintenance first. All of the equipment was checked before being sent out to hospitals, he said.

As ventilator demand keeps rising, medical device makers may not want to release repair information to protect their spot within the market, according to Marissa Fayer, CEO of HERHealthEQ, a medical advocacy group for women.

“Medical device manufacturers hold the intellectual property and patents for their equipment, so only themselves or licensed service providers would be able to perform maintenance,” Fayer said. “In a normal world, this is a large source of revenue for them, so it would be natural that their IP is protected, as not to have copies in the market.”

Masks Poor Fit:

“McCullough added that the company’s wide range of N95 respirators come in multiple sizes and were developed and tested by standards established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Some health-care experts say cost-savings is a big reason why manufacturers don’t have a variety of sizes available for workers. Although several sizes of each type of PPE may be produced, a “one-size-fits-all” mentality prevails, says Marissa Fayer, CEO of HERHealthEQ, a nonprofit focused on reducing female mortality in developing nations by providing access to medical device equipment.

“Supply chains are stretched thin, and often run by men, so multiple sizes aren’t thought of when a price break on a larger volume would allow a hospital system to keep costs down,” Fayer said.”

By | 2020-04-30T20:45:06+00:00 April 30th, 2020|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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